Mary S. Hulst

Mary S. Hulst (mary.hulst@gmail.com) is Assistant Professor of Preaching at Calvin Theological Seminary, Grand Rapids, Michigan. She is an ordained pastor in the Christian Reformed Church.

Articles by this author:

  • Ashes and Water

    Lent begins in dust and ash: “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you will return.” Many an Ash Wednesday I have left worship and gone into grocery stores or ridden public transportation with ashes on my forehead. When I next glance at myself in a restroom mirror, I quickly wipe off the smudge. The dust is met with water and washes clean away.

  • When Pastors Come...and Go

    Litanies for Services of Installation and Parting

    Litany for a Service of Installation


    This litany was prepared by Jerry Kramer for the installation service of copastors at the beginning of their ministry. The litany could easily be adapted for the installation of one pastor. Congregations could also consider different symbols appropriate to their situation.

    —ERB

  • Book: The Worshiping Life: Meditations on the Order of Worship

    Lisa Nichols Hickman (Louisville:Westminster/John Knox, 2005). 162 pp. $14.95.

    This is a rich, nourishing book. Arranged according to the order of worship (Gathering, Proclaiming, Responding, Sealing, Bearing Out), each piece offers an insightful and inviting look at the moves of worship.

  • Beyond the "Children's Message": Welcoming Children in Worship

    The little boy came running over at a church gathering. “Pastor Mary!” he said, with a finger in his mouth. “Look!” I saw a fresh gap where his tooth used to be. “Ryan!” I said. “You’ve lost your first tooth!” He grinned back. “And the one next to it is loose!”

  • A classic TULIP bouquet: service plans exploring five doctrinal distinctives, page 1 of 2

    List the five points of Calvinism,” I asked the congregation one Sunday at the start of a service. “We often use the mnemonic TULIP to help us remember what they are, so let’s work our way down the list, starting with T.” “Total Depravity,” came back loud and clear, but after that the sound level decreased noticeably with each successive point, and I could see that most of the noise was coming from those with a bit—or more—of gray around the temples.