Share |

Worship Series

Just Amos

A Four-week Series

What is worship? Who is it for? Who can attend? In our North American culture often the answer in practice is that worship is for us churchgoers, but of course anyone who wants to can come and participate. Worship is for our enjoyment, amusement, or sanctification. We spend a lot of time and energy on planning our worship; we even have publications, denominational staff, and church staff whose sole purpose is to help with the planning and implementation of worship. And all of it is meaningless. Absolutely meaningless.

Unless . . .

The Gift of True Strength

A Sermon Series Based on 1 Samuel 1 to 12

After Easter

A Series for Ascension, Pentecost, Trinity Sunday—and Beyond

The liturgical church year and the “programmatic” church year often feel most at odds in the weeks when we celebrate Ascension, Pentecost, and Trinity Sunday. In the midst of children’s and family ministries winding down for the season and church staff and worship leaders beginning to sigh with relief after the holy (and blessed) busyness of the Easter season, it’s easy to lose sight of the significance of these important Sundays of the church year and the unique opportunities for teaching and worship they afford. Additionally, these days hold big theological themes. It’s easy for us to get lost in amazement, wonder, and confusion instead of finding ways to make these themes relevant to our own lives and for the whole world.

The liturgical church year and the “programmatic” church year often feel most at odds in the weeks when we celebrate Ascension, Pentecost, and Trinity Sunday. In the midst of children’s and family ministries winding down for the season and church staff and worship leaders beginning to sigh with relief after the holy (and blessed) busyness of the Easter season, it’s easy to lose sight of the significance of these important Sundays of the church year and the unique opportunities for teaching and worship they afford.

From Dark to Sight

A Lenten Journey

The two disciples traveling from Jerusalem to the village of Emmaus on the evening of Easter Sunday are on a journey that began in sorrowful despair at the sudden death of their beloved friend and master. However by the time they reach their destination their outlook is completely transformed into one of light and hope. An unrecognized traveler joins them, and the conversation he holds with them causes their hearts to burn with new insight and excitement. This encounter changes their lives—a journey from blindness to enlightenment, from darkness to sight.

Enter the Songs

An Advent Series with a Lessons and Carols Service

Finding a fresh way to share, experience, and delight in the Advent season and in the celebration of Christmas can prove challenging year after year. The story is well known to church members, and creating services that encourage them to enter the story with fresh, excited, and expectant eyes and hearts can be difficult.