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Content about Preaching -- Methodology

June 1, 2007

In Part One of this article I presented the case that the church should consistently instruct and encourage Christians to live in obedience to God. Some complain that God’s law is a burden. Yet God’s will for our lives is not a set of arbitrary demands, it is how God designed us to live and the path to blessing. “Blessed are those who do not walk in step with the wicked . . . but who delight in the law of the Lord” (Ps. 1).

March 1, 2000

For fourteen years it was pretty much the same story for me, When Monday dawned, 1 knew 1 had to find another two preaching texts for Sunday. It was amazing how many other things I found to do that kept me away from the search, but as Mondays evaporated into Tuesdays, a sense of desperation would set in. What was I going to preach on, and would 1 have the time and the creativity to write a good sermon, now that Tuesday was changing into Wednesday?

December 1, 1988

Stories—all of us love them. A good story lives in the memory, enlivens and evokes thought and feeling, invites identification and involvement, and works its special magic long after truths stated in a more dogmatic way have sunk into oblivion. As Anthony de Mellow says, "The shortest distance between truth and the hearts of hearers is a story."

June 1, 1988

In recent years, many pastors have changed their approach to preaching. The lectio continua method, long a cherished Reformed tradition, has been replaced by series shaped by themes or outlined by the Common Lectionary or based on the preacher's pet topics. In this article Hughes Oliphant Old argues that the lectio continua approach is as effective in today's pulpits as it was in the pulpits of the early Reformation.