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Content about Trinity Sunday

January 22, 2018

While I was planning our Trinity Sunday worship service, I was inspired by my study of 2 Corinthians 13:11–13. In verse 11, the word that is often translated “be perfected” or “put things in order” is the same word used in the gospels to describe the mending of fishing nets. In this prayer, the joys and concerns of the congregation are lifted up to the triune God, who is the mender of our nets and our lives. This idea became a theme for this prayer.

March 1, 2007

Our church follows the seasons of the Christian year and the lectionary Scripture passages, changing banners and colors accordingly. When we planned a service called “Singing Through the Christian Year,” it provided us with the opportunity to “walk through” the Christian year in one evening and to reprise many of the choir anthems we had learned and used in services over the past year.

March 1, 2007

March 1, 2007

March 1, 2007

Q: Why should we observe Trinity Sunday when it isn’t a clear event in Scripture? What is gained from dedicating one Sunday a year to this theme?

A: It is true that Trinity Sunday is unlike Pentecost and Christmas in that it doesn’t focus on a particular historical narrative.

March 3, 2003
Song of Intercession
A Touching Place

Click to listen  [ full version ]

March 1, 1998

The service, along with complete a complete script for the worship leaders and notes for their rehearsal, was submitted by Rachael Boles. She writes:

The Church of the Holy Trinity is a suburban Anglican parish with a worshiping community of just under a hundred people; the Guildwood Community Presbyterian Church across the road is similar in size. For many years we have worshiped together on a Sunday in June. By tradition, the minister from the other church preaches in the host church.

March 1, 1997

The Sunday after Pentecost is often called Trinity Sunday in recognition that all three persons of the Trinity have now been remembered and celebrated in the great festivals of the Christian year. From now until Advent, we enter the long "Ordinary Time" or "Trinity Season" as some churches call it.

March 1, 1995

These four services celebrating God's creation have been designed to fit into the liturgical calendar on the Sundays between Ascension Day and the first Sunday in Ordinary Time. The services would be equally appropriate as a freestanding series on creation sometime during the summer months.