Drama

Props: two podiums, a large piece of black fabric; a large, sturdy easel; a large canvas with a rainbow penciled so lightly on it that it isn’t visible to the audience; violet, indigo, blue, green, yellow, orange, and red paint; seven paint brushes; a large dropcloth; a small table; a chair; a cot; two violet shawls; indigo fabric the size of a small tablecloth; a small blue vase; two green baskets with handles; enough bookmarks for each person present [bookmarks are made of spring-green paper with “God is making everything new!” printed on them]; a large,

Participants

  • Two Readers
  • Six Choral Readers (three “First Choral Readers” and three “Second Choral Readers”)
  • Soloist
  • Four Umbrella People
  • Mary
  • Seeker
  • Accuser
  • Sick woman

Props

  • Five umbrellas:

    • red—the blood of Christ (salvation)
    • green—green pastures (protection)

Christian, Grimes, and Allgood

A Liturgy and Drama for Confession and Assurance

A Call to Confession

Brothers and sisters, hear these words from Galatians 5:

So I say, live by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the sinful nature. For the sinful nature desires what is contrary to the Spirit, and the Spirit what is contrary to the sinful nature. They are in conflict with each other, so that you do not do what you want (NIV, 1984).

Drama: Christian, Grimes, and Allgood

Characters: Christian, Grimes (who represents a devil), and Allgood (who represents the Spirit)

The book of Isaiah has long been appreciated for its vivid imagery depicting broad messianic themes: the Anointed One, the Coming One who will bring about God’s redemptive purposes in history; the Messiah as King who “will judge the needy with righteousness and with justice will give decisions for the poor”; but also the Messiah as an obedient servant whose suffering unto death works God’s redemption. As a consequence, Isaiah has often been called “the fifth gospel.”

Let Me Go

A Dramatic Reading on Obeying God

Obedience to God is always a struggle among God’s people. This dramatic reading challenges the congregation to examine their excuses for not following Christ in obedience.

The reading is designed for four readers, male or female, and one unseen voice (narrator). The dramatic reading takes approximately four minutes.

[All four voices are on the stage spaced five feet apart with their backs to the congregation.]

Voice 1: [turns to face congregation] Lord, you know I want to follow you. But first let me go and bury my father.

This readers’ theater was originally written and performed for a women’s Bible study event several years ago. It was also used in a worship service with members of our church’s Friendship program, a ministry for people with cognitive impairments
(see www.friendship.org).

Scripture passages used include Revelation 19:9; Luke 14:16-23; Luke 15:22-23; John 4:1-26; Luke 19:1-10; Luke 23:42-43.

My Only Comfort

A Dramatic Reading by Young People

This versatile drama presentation, based on the Heidelberg Catechism’s first question and answer, can be included in a worship service in a variety of settings and stages. The reading can be adapted to include five to twenty or more student readers. For Part 3, you’ll need three different colors of T-shirts for three small groups of two to three students—each of the small groups puts on a matching color T-shirt to identify them as a group. (Inexpensive colored T-shirts are available at most large craft stores.)

Flesh and Blood

A Drama Celebrating the Lord's Supper

This conversational drama was the centerpiece of a service examining the significance of taking Christ’s body and blood during the Lord’s Supper. It includes four narrators in costume: Jewish scholar, Man-on-the-street, Scientist, and Nurse. A table in the center holds chemicals and glassware for a science demonstration. If possible, obtain a few slides (see list of props) to project at appropriate points as a visual aid.