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Perspectives

Grace and Peace

A Necessity for New Testament Worshipers

Most Christians who read the Bible notice that “grace” and “peace” are mentioned quite frequently—not merely in isolation, but together.

In fact, in the New Testament, the terms are paired together seventeen times. Grace and peace are mentioned together in Romans,
1 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians, 1 Peter, and eleven other New Testament books. Clearly this pairing is not incidental, but speaks to what we as believers need in our everyday walk with Christ.

Ascension: To Do or Not to Do

Learning from the RW Community

Reformed Worship editors asked a few subscribers the following questions about the significance of Ascension Day and how it should be acknowledged in our worship.

  • How significant is Ascension Day for the church?
  • How much attention should it receive in our worship? Should there be a worship service on Ascension Day? Incorporated into worship the Sunday before or after? Or something else?

Here are the responses of Pastor Eric Dirksen and Professor of Christian Worship Rod Snaterse.

Ten Things I Learned from a Conversation with Eddie Espinosa

At the 2019 Calvin Symposium on Worship, I had the privilege of hosting a conversation with Eddie Espinosa, the Vineyard Anaheim worship leader who was an influential figure in the development of contemporary praise and worship music in the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s.

Call It Worship

A Conversation About Cultural Diversity and Worship

It’s in the news. It’s in our politics. It’s in our streets. And increasingly, it’s in our churches: diversity—or, more specifically, conflict over the ethnic, racial, and cultural differences that mark “us” as “us” and “them” as “them,” those who are “in” and those who are “out.”

Terrorism and the Politics of Worship

This article first appeared in Public Justice Review and is reprinted here with permission.

September 11 fell on a Tuesday. Five days later, on Sunday, September 16, millions of American Christians, shocked, angry, and grieving, filed into church.

The music began to play. Some were invited into the defiant and militant melodies of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” and “God Bless America.” Some were invited into a time of mournful silence, prayer, and reflection. Others just sang the same old songs as if nothing had changed at all.