Emily R. Brink

Emily R. Brink (embrink@calvin.edu) is Senior Research Fellow for the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship and former editor of Reformed Worship.

 

Articles by this author:

  • Singing the Psalms

    Eternal and Yet Ever New

    It’s been five hundred years since the Protestant Reformation, a good time to remember the new ways of singing the psalms in the sixteenth century that now, however, seem very old. But the psalms are so much older! The oldest psalm, Psalm 90, which we sing as “O God, Our Help in Ages Past,” was probably written by Moses.

  • Worship From the Heart to the Heavens

    A Song Service for Use between Ash Wednesday and Ascension Sunday

    Worship from the Heart to the Heavens” has been a frequent and fertile theme over the many years that I have planned and led worship services with a focus on congregational song, both in North America and beyond. This theme is a testimony that we’re never alone when we worship God. We always worship in community as part of the body of Christ, not only when we are in a congregation with others, but also by ourselves, in our “closets.” That is a comforting truth!

  • Punjabi Psalms

    An Interview with Eric Sarwar, Part 2

    In 2009, Emily Brink and Paul Neeley participated in two worship conferences in Pakistan co-sponsored by the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship (CICW) and the Tehillim School of Church Music and Worship (TSCM). Rev. Eric Sarwar, a pastor in the Presbyterian Church of Pakistan and founder of TSCM, arranged both conferences, one at the Presbyterian Seminary in Gujranwala, and the other hosted by Christ the King Roman Catholic Seminary in Karachi.

  • Punjabi Psalms

    An Interview with Eric Sarwar, Part 1

    In 2009, Emily Brink and Paul Neeley participated in two worship conferences in Pakistan co-sponsored by the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship (CICW) and the Tehillim School of Church Music and Worship (TSCM). Rev. Eric Sarwar, a pastor in the Presbyterian Church of Pakistan and founder of TSCM, arranged both conferences, one at the Presbyterian Seminary in Gujranwala, and the other hosted by Christ the King Roman Catholic Seminary in Karachi.

    Article Resources: 
  • Songs for the Ascended Christ and the Descending Spirit

    Why This Dark Conspiracy/Psalm 2; Wordless, Ancient Earth’s Foundations; Lord, Fill My Whole Heart with Love; May the Love of the Lord

    Why This Dark Conspiracy/Psalm 2

    Psalm 2 may be best known through that famous aria in Handel’s Messiah in which the bass thunders and the strings shudder: “Why do the nations so furiously rage together? And why do the peoples imagine a vain thing?”

  • Songs for the Christmas Cycle

    Psalm 126/When God Restored Our Common Life; In the Heavens There Shone a Star; Psalm 30/I Will Praise You, O God; Psalm 111/The Fear of the Lord

    Every year Christians celebrate the two great festivals of Christmas and Easter that give meaning to our lives: Christ’s coming to earth in human form and in humility, and Christ’s return to his Father in a glorified human body. This year, Advent begins on November 27 with the Scripture passages in the Revised Common Lectionary for Year B.

  • Wisdom around the World

    A New Document for Worship Planners Everywhere

    What worship issues or needs are of most concern in your church? This question was posed in a questionnaire sent to Reformed churches around the world (see list on website). A sample of what those churches said concerned them the most is found below:

    “Training of pastors in theology of worship, preaching/leading worship”

    “Inclusiveness of women, youth, and children”

    “Training of musicians in theology of worship and music skills”

  • Songs for Ascension, Pentecost, and Trinity Sunday

    God the Spirit Comes to Stay; Come Down, O Love Divine; Bonds of Peace; The Unity of the Spirit; The Church That Is One; Praise God from Whom All Blessings Flow

    On Ascension Day, the church celebrates Christ’s going up and returning to his Father in glory as a resurrected human being, the firstfruits of the new creation. Ten days later, we celebrate God coming down again, this time not in human form in a particular time and place—as we celebrate at Christmas—but now as Spirit, a gift to each believer in every time and place. The Christian church has also traditionally followed Pentecost Sunday with Trinity Sunday, our praise and adoration ascending to our triune God—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

  • Framing the Psalms for Singing

    Psalm 1: Planted By the Water; Psalm 63: My Soul Thirsts for God; Psalm 131: The Pride from My Heart; Like a Child

    Imagine a piece of art that you would like to hang or install in your home. If it’s a painting, you’d want to frame it and then find the right spot in the right room for it, so that your viewing of the painting would be enriched by its placement. If it’s a sculpture, you’d want to find the spot that best honors the piece and allows you to enjoy it fully.

  • Songs for Ascension, Pentecost, and Justice

    Psalm 68: Let God Arise; My Heart Is Filled with Thankfulness; Come, Holy Spirit; In Great Thanksgiving/All Who Are Thirsty

    Psalm 68: Let God Arise