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More than a Fiesta

Paying Attention to Latino Protestant Congregations

Worship Is: Working for Justice

Christian worship, especially in the Reformed lineage, has always been about a great deal more than what we do in church on Sunday. “Work is worship” my parents used to say (except on Sunday). Service is worship. And there was a great deal of talk about sacrificing—especially when I became a teenager—referenced to the first verse of Romans 12.

This wide definition of worship, in my experience, has been both a great gift of our tradition and a sorry excuse for impoverished formal worship.

Singing the Story Into Our Bones

Cultural forces can sometimes affect how we “see” the Bible, how we approach the Scriptures. So we receive the Bible as a sort of divine encyclopedia full of revealed “facts,” or we treat it as an abstract rule book, or we revere it as merely a historic relic of a past when people seemed to actually encounter God. What gets lost in these functional “pictures” of the Bible is something central to the Scriptures themselves: the fact that the Bible is a story. God reveals himself to us in a narrative.

Ten Reasons Why Hymnals Have a Future

The function of hymnals in the life of the church has changed dramatically over the past thirty years. Many congregations rarely use them. Thousands of Christians seldom, if ever, open one. When people hear of the publication of Lift Up Your Hearts (LUYH), it’s natural for some of them to ask, “Why would you ever want to publish another hymnal?”

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Echoes of the Way God Made Us

Creativity in Worship

At breakfast recently, my two-year-old, Maggie, was having an animated conversation with a sausage. When I asked her with whom she was talking, she held up the link and told me it was Olivia, the precocious pig who is the subject of her favorite books. While the irony of pretending that a sausage was a pig was lost on Maggie, the joy of imagination was not. Her “Olivia” went on an adventure around her plate, chatting with strawberries, playing in the oatmeal, and finally suffering a tragic end, eaten by a “Maggie-monster.”